Best Credit Card Sign-up Bonuses in June 2024

Sign-up bonuses are a common credit card incentive — and plenty of cards offer them. The best credit card sign-up bonuses have achievable spending requirements, offer a valuable haul of points, and provide flexible redemption options so you can use your rewards in a way that works for you. 

When selecting a card with a sign-up bonus, consider your spending habits and needs. Starting with an end goal, like a two-week hike in New Zealand or a week at a luxury resort in Hawaii, can help you pick a card with the right points currency, transfer partners, and rewards haul to make your dream vacation a reality.

Erika's Picks for Best Sign-up Bonuses

  • Best overall: Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card
  • Best premium travel card: Chase Sapphire Reserve®
  • Best for everyday rewards: Citi Premier® Card
  • Best attainable welcome offer: Wells Fargo Active Cash Visa® Card
  • Best business travel card: Chase Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

. . .

Best Overall: Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card

  • Rewards rate: 10x miles on hotels and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel; 5x miles on flights booked through Capital One Travel; 2x miles on all other purchases
  • Welcome offer: Earn 75,000 miles after spending $4,000 in the first three months
  • Annual fee: $395

. . .

The Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card offers a hefty sign-up bonus and is jam-packed with rewards. The benefits more than offset the annual fee, even for the occasional traveler.

As a new cardholder, you can earn 75,000 miles, equal to $750, after spending $4,000 on purchases in the first three months. You’ll also earn 10x miles on hotels and rental cars booked through Capital One Travel, 5x miles on flights booked through Capital One Travel, and 2x miles on all other purchases.

You'll also receive a $300 travel statement credit for bookings made through Capital One Travel and a statement credit of up to $100 for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck. After your first year, you’ll be eligible to earn a 10,000-mile anniversary bonus (equal to $100 in travel) each year, too.

This card is designed with travelers in mind. You and up to two guests will get access to more than 1,300 airport lounges. If you need to rent a car, the Venture X Rewards makes you eligible for Hertz President’s Circle status.

Get started with the Capital One Venture X Rewards Credit Card or read our full review.

Best Premium Travel Card: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

  • Rewards rate: 10x points on hotel stays and car rentals through Chase Travel℠; 5x points on dining purchases through Chase Ultimate Rewards and on Lyft purchases (through March 2025); 5x points on flights booked through Chase Travel℠ (after the first $300 is spent on travel purchases annually); 3x points on restaurants and travel; 1x points on everything else
  • Welcome offer: Earn 60,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening
  • Annual fee: $550
chase sapphire reserve

. . .

The Chase Sapphire Reserve® offers one of the most valuable sign-up bonuses on the market. You can earn 60,000 points after spending $4,000 in the first three months. That’s equal to $750 if you use it to book travel through Chase Travel℠ and is in addition to a $300 annual travel credit. 

Points are earned through different tiers of rewards. Hotel reservations and car rentals booked through Chase Travel℠ and dining booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards earn 10x points, while flights booked through Chase Travel℠ earn 5x points (both rates apply after earning a $300 travel credit). All other travel and dining purchases earn 3x points (again, after earning your $300 travel credit). 

You’ll also get access to more than 1,300 airport lounges worldwide, including the new Chase Sapphire Lounges. And up to $100 statement credit every four years to put towards your application for TSA PreCheck or Global Entry.

One thing you’ll have to consider is the annual fee — the cost is only outweighed by rewards and benefits if you travel enough. However, it does have no foreign transaction fees.

Learn more about the Chase Sapphire Reserve® or read our full review.

Best for Everyday Rewards: Citi Premier® Card

  • Rewards rate: 10x points on hotel and car rental bookings made through the Citi Travel portal (through June 30, 2024); 3x points on restaurants, supermarkets, gas stations, air travel, and hotels; 1x points on all other purchases
  • Welcome offer: Earn 60,000 bonus points (worth $600 in gift cards or travel with Citi Travel) after spending $4,000 in the first three months
  • Annual fee: $95
citi premier card

. . .

The Citi Premier® Card is a great choice if you want to snag a great sign-up bonus without necessarily planning international travel. You can earn 60,000 bonus points after spending $4,000 in the first three months.

Until June 30, 2024, you’ll earn 10x points on hotel bookings and car rentals made through Citi Travel. You also have a ton of reward potential in several everyday spending categories — like 3x points for restaurants, supermarkets, gas stations, air travel, and other hotels. Citi ThankYou Points don’t expire and there’s no cap on earning rewards.

ThankYou Points can be used to shop directly on sites like Amazon or redeemed for gift cards. Points can be transferred to participating loyalty programs at no cost to you.

Aside from points, each year, you’ll receive $100 off on a single hotel stay of at least $500 booked through thankyou.com. 

The Citi Premier Card has a lower annual fee than other travel cards in its class, plus it comes with no foreign transaction fees.

Best Attainable Welcome Offer: Wells Fargo Active Cash® Visa Card

  • Rewards rate: Unlimited 2% cashback on all purchases
  • Welcome offer: Earn $200 after spending $500 in the first three months
  • Annual fee: $0
Wells Fargo Active Cash Credit Card

. . .

Sometimes the best sign-up bonus is the one that’s easiest to qualify for. The Wells Fargo Active Cash card offers a great welcome offer if you're just getting started with credit cards or don't yet qualify for a premium card.

You’ll earn a sign-up bonus of $200 after spending $500 in the first month. That’s essentially 40% cashback on spending you were probably going to do anyway.

After that, you’ll earn a flat rate of 2% cashback on all purchases — that’s at the top of the range for flat-rate cashback. Plus, flat-rate rewards are simpler and much easier to manage than rotating bonus categories.

Cashback can be redeemed as a statement credit, a gift card, or even as cash from a Wells Fargo ATM. 

Another notable perk of the Active Cash is cellphone protection up to $600 per claim (max two claims per year, $25 deductible applies.)

This is also one of the few cards that offers a sign-up bonus without charging an annual fee. If you can comfortably pay off your balance in full, you’ll earn the $200 bonus for free.

Best Business Travel Card: Chase Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

  • Rewards rate: 3x points on every dollar spent on shipping, advertising with social media and search engines, internet, cable, phone, and travel — up to the first $150,000 spent in combined purchases in these categories; 1x per dollar spent everywhere else
  • Welcome offer: Earn 100,000 bonus points after you spend $8,000 in purchases in the first 3 months
  • Annual fee: $95
Ink Business Preferred Credit Card

. . .

With the Chase Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card, you can earn 100,000 points by spending $8,000 on purchases in the first three months of having the card. That's worth $1,250 in travel if redeemed through the Chase Ultimate Rewards travel portal.

This card earns bonus points in the areas where business owners likely spend a lot of money. You can earn 3 points per dollar spent on travel, shipping, advertising on social media and search engines, plus costs for internet, cable, and phone services. You'll earn the bonus points on the first $150,000 spent per year in these categories combined.

Until March 2025, you can also get 5 points per dollar spent on Lyft rides. Any purchases outside of these categories will earn 1 point per dollar spent.

When you redeem your points for travel through the Chase Ultimate Reward portal you'll get a 25% increase in value. But you don't have to redeem them for travel, you can also redeem them for cash, gift cards, and travel experiences.

The Chase Ink Business Preferred is a great travel card as it has no foreign transaction fees, primary rental car coverage, and trip cancellation/interruption insurance.

It also comes with extended warranty protection, purchase protection, and cellphone protection.

Learn more about the Chase Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card.

How Do Credit Card Sign-up Bonuses Work?

To earn a sign-up bonus, you’ll usually have to hit a minimum spending threshold in the first three to six months after opening your account. The requirements vary and can range from $500 to $4,000 or more. 

Read the fine print to make sure you know what you need to do to earn the sign-up bonus. It’s never worth it to spend beyond your means just to earn a sign-up bonus — if you end up carrying that balance from month to month, the interest will quickly offset your bonus.

Once you hit the minimum spending requirement and your card provider validates you’ve met any additional requirements, your sign-up bonus will be credited to your account.

Some issuers note that it could take several weeks for the bonus to be finalized, or that you’ll need to wait until the end of the eligibility period, but it’s not uncommon for your bonus to be reflected in your account within a week or so of hitting the threshold.

What to Look for in a Sign-up Bonus

Credit cards with large sign-up bonuses can be enticing, especially if you’re looking to use them to help fund a vacation. Many cards offer boosted value when your points are redeemed through the issuer’s travel portal, so this is a great way to maximize a welcome offer.

When you’re ready to start shopping for a credit card with the best sign-up bonus for you, here are a few things to look for:

Does it fit within your budget?

If you have enough expenses to comfortably hit the minimum spending requirement, then this will be a no-brainer.

But if you need to spend more money than you’re used to in order to qualify, you’ll want to think carefully about whether it fits into your budget. Overspending can lead to debt, and interest can diminish the value of your earned points.

Is the annual fee worth it?

Some of the best sign-up bonuses are tied to cards with expensive annual fees. In many cases, these cards provide benefits that surpass the cost of owning the card.

If you’re eyeing a premium card and aren’t sure whether the fee will be worth it, take a look at the benefits and figure out if (and how) you’ll actually use them.

Are there any restrictions?

Holding multiple cards is common, but could get in the way of your bonus if they're with the same issuer. That's because some issuers won’t allow you to claim a bonus if you’ve earned one with the same family of cards before, or if you’ve earned a bonus with one of their cards within the last few years.

Other credit cards might have limitations on how points can be redeemed. Make sure you review any restrictions to determine if they’ll affect your ability to earn rewards.

How will you use the card?

Figure out how you plan to use the card before opening an account. Will it be used to cover personal expenses or do you plan to use it for your business? Will you use the card for daily expenses or a big purchase, like a new sofa?

Develop a plan for how you plan to use the card to see which sign-up bonus makes sense for you.

Do the points expire?

Some cards come with points that have to be used within a specific window. Check the fine print and ensure you can use earned points from the sign-up bonus before they expire.

Will you even be able to use the points you earn?

Many travel reward credit cards offer great sign-up bonuses, but if you aren’t able to use them, earning the bonus might be a moot point. Before applying for cards, ensure you can use the points you plan to earn effectively.

For example, if your airport isn’t served by the issuer’s travel partner network, you may not be able to get the best value from points.

Pros and Cons of Sign-up Bonuses

Credit card sign-up bonuses can be very enticing — that’s kind of the point. Issuers offer them as an incentive for you to sign up for their card over another issuer’s.

They can be a great way to kickstart your rewards balance, but it’s important to consider the implications of pursuing a credit card sign-up bonus:

Pros

  • Extra cash: Cards that offer a sign-up bonus without charging an annual fee are basically handing out free cash. Paying your balance in full avoids interest, allowing you to earn the sign-up bonus money for free. Plus, points you accrue can be used as statement credits, helping offset the costs of your monthly expenses.
  • Free vacations: Travel hackers know the value of sign-up bonuses well. When you’re strategic about how you use your sign-up bonus, you can score a free — or at the very least, heavily discounted — vacation. Combine the bonus with many of the other perks travel credit cards offer, such as statement credits and airport lounge access, to have a premium travel experience. 
  • Build credit: While this might not be your primary goal when you open up a new credit card, you may also boost your credit score. New credit accounts for 10% of your credit score. Just be careful: Opening too many cards in a short time can also hurt your score.

Cons

  • Risk of overspending: This is probably one of the greatest risks of credit cards with attractive sign-up bonuses. Meeting the spending requirement with extra money can lead to challenging credit card debt.
  • Damage credit: Making a lot of purchases to your card in a short time just to get the sign-up bonus can impact your credit utilization. This is how much of your available credit you’re using and accounts for 30% of your FICO score. High credit utilization signals to potential lenders that you may be a risky borrower.
  • Unable to use the sign-up bonus: The sign-up bonus is only good so long as you can use it. This is especially true if the card has restrictions on how you can redeem your points or if they expire. Choosing a travel card may not be worthwhile if you can't take time off work.
  • Managing multiple cards takes work: To earn multiple sign-up points for a free vacation, you need to manage various rewards programs. This can take a lot more time and effort than you might be anticipating.
Man holding credit card and laptop. Best credit card sign-up bonuses

FAQs 

How many credit card sign-up bonuses can I earn?

There’s technically no limit to how many credit cards you can hold. Many credit card issuers will even allow you to earn a sign-up bonus more than once. Be sure to read the fine print though. Chase, for example, has a 48-month rule: If you’ve previously earned a sign-up bonus from any Sapphire card, you’ll have to wait 48 months until you can earn it again.

One loophole you might consider is strategically working toward credit card sign-up bonuses in tandem with your partner. You can individually sign up for the same credit card, making both of you eligible for the same sign-up bonus.

When will I receive my bonus? 

Before you receive your bonus, you’re going to have to meet the spending requirement. Spending requirements vary from a few thousand dollars to just a few hundred.

Most bonuses require you to meet the spending requirement in the first three to six months. After meeting the requirements, your issuer will verify and credit your account. Bonus posting varies; it may take a few days or a billing cycle or two.

Are credit card sign-up bonuses worth it?

Yes, if the spending requirement is within your budget. To figure out if a sign-up bonus makes sense for you, evaluate whether you can meet the minimum spending requirement without changing your spending habits.

Overspending just to earn a welcome offer is unlikely to pay off in the long run, as the interest you’ll accrue on lingering credit card debt will eat into any rewards you earn.

Review rewards program details to ensure you benefit from the bonus before opening an account.


Disclosure: Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity. This content has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of the entities included within the post.

Latest Articles
Broken eggs on a kitchen floor, with a person's feet in the background.

What To Do When Your Stocks Are Losing Money

View over a woman's shoulder of her laptop screen showing an investing graph.

Types of Trades: 3 Ways to Buy and Sell Stocks in Your Portfolio

Focus on a clock in the foreground with a smiling woman drinking coffee at her laptop in the background.

How Much Time Does It Really Take to Manage Your Investments?

Close-up image of a woman making a number three hand sign.

What Is Strategic Trading: 3 Key Principles

A notepad that lists out financial goals, with a calculator and coffee beside it.

Choosing the Right Savings Goals: Short-Term vs. Long-Term Financial Goals

Related Articles

Compare To Other Cards

Best Offers From Our partners

Reward rate

Welcome bonus

Annual fee

Regular APR

Recommended credit

Author picture

I'm an award-winning lawyer and personal finance expert featured in Inc. Magazine, CNBC, the Today Show, Business Insider and more. My mission is to make personal finance accessible for everyone. As the largest financial influencer in the world, I'm connected to a community of over 20 million followers across TikTok, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook and Twitter. I'm also the host of the podcast Erika Taught Me. You might recognize me from my viral tagline, "I read the fine print so you don't have to!"

I'm a graduate of Georgetown Law, where I founded the Georgetown Law Entrepreneurship Club, and the University of Notre Dame. I discovered my passion for personal finance after realizing I was drowning in over $200,000 of student debt and needed to take action-ultimately paying off my student loans in under 2 years. I then spent years as a corporate lawyer representing Fortune 500 companies, but I quit because I realized I wanted to have an impact; I wanted to help real people and teach them that you can create a financial future for yourself.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our aim is to help you make financial decisions with confidence through our objective article content and reviews. Erika.com is part of an affiliate sales network and receives compensation for sending traffic to partner sites, such as MileValue.com. This compensation may impact how and where links appear on this site. This site does not include all financial companies or all available financial offers. This in no way affects our recommendations or article content.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our aim is to help you make financial decisions with confidence through our objective article content and reviews. Erika.com is part of an affiliate sales network and receives compensation for sending traffic to partner sites, such as MileValue.com. This compensation may impact how and where links appear on this site. This site does not include all financial companies or all available financial offers. This in no way affects our recommendations or article content.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our aim is to help you make financial decisions with confidence through our objective article content and reviews. Erika.com is part of an affiliate sales network and receives compensation for sending traffic to partner sites, such as MileValue.com. This compensation may impact how and where links appear on this site. This site does not include all financial companies or all available financial offers. This in no way affects our recommendations or article content.